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Tag: SOUND

Dental Drill Noise-Canceling Device Connects With MP3 Players

For many people, the mere sound of a dentist's drill starting up is enough to make them sweat and panic. But researchers have created a new device that cancels out the drill's high-pitched whir while allowing patients to hear the dentist's voice. According to BBC News, the device, which was developed jointly at King's College London, Brunel University and London South Bank University, contains...

Gift Guide: Encourage Audiophilia With Aiaiai's TMA-1 Headphones

It's tough to stand out in the headphone crowd (especially without looking like you're trying too hard), but Aiaiai's TMA-1 phones do so with the utmost subtlety. These minimal, utilitarian cans are coated in a matte rubber, which makes them remarkably drop-, bend- and crush-resistant. They're sturdy without being heavy (less than seven ounces, in fact), meaning they won't cause ear soreness or...

'Super-Microphone' Pinpoints Individual Sounds Inside Noisy Arenas

A couple of Norwegian scientists have created a "super-microphone" that sports fans will love and athletes will probably hate. According to New Scientist, the AudioScope, which hangs from the ceiling, is comprised of 300 microphones arranged in a circle with a wide-angle camera placed in the middle. And it's apparently powerful enough to isolate a single sound from the din of an arena. After...

Dentsu London and PIXMA: The Color of Sound, Captured on Film

For the Canon PIXMA's new ad campaign, Dentsu London (which helped to create those amazing 3-D iPad light paintings) has devised a way to photograph droplets of paint reacting to sound. In conjunction with biochemist Linden Gledhill, Dentsu stretched a membrane over a speaker, dropped a few colors on it, vibrated the paint with a single audio frequency, and shot the whole thing on a spinning rig...

Wine Bottle-Shaped USB Speaker and FM Radio Only Makes Us Thirsty

December may be months away, but it's never too early to start thinking about what you could buy your favorite alcoholic uncle this holiday season. Instead of grabbing yet another handle of his special medicine, though, you might want to consider getting a bottle that'll keep on giving -- something like, say, a Wine Bottle USB Speaker and FM Radio. As Coolest Gadgets explains, the bottle...

Teen Hearing Loss Increases, Researchers Blame Loud MP3 Players

What? We couldn't hear our parents when they told us rock-and-roll would make us deaf, and teens today still ignore the dangers of loud (but inherently awesome) noises. A recent nationwide study found that teenage hearing loss has increased drastically over the past 20 years -- with one in five teens now suffering slight hearing loss. The number of teens incapable of hearing levels from 16- to...

I.B.M.'s Jeopardy-Playing Watson Profiled, Optimize Your Outdoor Audio

There's a load of great tech news happening out there every day, and, unfortunately, we just can't cover it all. Here are a few of the other noteworthy things we saw today on our never-ending journey through the wild, wild Web. Watson, I.B.M.'s Jeopardy-playing supercomputer, gets profiled in the New York Times Magazine. See how you fare against a chunk of silicon that can understand...

Software Hears and Writes Music, Like a Personal Debussy

Some musical prodigies can listen to a song once, then bang it out, note for note, on a piano. Others can pick out A-flats and C-sharps from the cacophony of rush hour traffic. These rare kinds of aural abilities, though, are no longer restricted to the domain of Mozarts and Mendelssohns, thanks to a new music-transcribing software developed by Spanish engineers. As PopSci explains, the...

ToneRite Gives Instruments Vintage Tone by Playing Them for You

If you are too busy, or too impatient, to break in your stringed instrument, you might want to consider a new hobby. Still, a small start-up in Gainesville, Florida might have a device that'll get that vintage tone for you -- without much work or time. According to The New York Times, the small plastic box, called ToneRite, slips onto the strings of a violin, viola, cello, double bass, guitar...

Researchers Tap Sound Vibrations to Create Energy

Scientists have searched from sea to sun in the exploration for alternative energy sources. Researchers at the University of Michigan have turned to sound; an unexpected, yet abundant source of energy. Scientists at U of M's Engineering Research Center for Wireless Integrated Microsystems have created miniature generators that produce energy from random vibrations, such as the sound of a...

Most Addictive Sounds Include Cell Phone Buzz, Nat Geo Theme Song

Advertising pundits love to focus on the suggestive power and subliminal symbolism inherent to corporate icons and logos. People tend to overlook, however, the significant influence that instantly recognizable sounds can have on the human subconscious. Elias Arts, a company that focuses on auditory studies, recently partnered with Buyology, Inc. to investigate the addictive power of sound and,...

'Tunebug' Turns Any Flat Surface Into a Speaker via Bluetooth

If there's one thing we know about technology, it's that portability often trumps all other attributes. Sure, vinyl might sound warmer, but you're not carting your discs around with you. How do you make a mobile device loaded with music even more portable? You ditch those external speakers and wired headphones. At CES 2010, Silicon Valley Global revealed a new product that needs only a flat...

'Half-Life 2' Mod Replaces All Sound Effects With Dude's Voice

Remember when you were a kid, and you'd use your mouth to make sound effects for toy guns and cars? Well, one intrepid gamer has taken that idea to the next level. He has replaced all the sound effects in 'Half-Life 2' with soundbites of his own voice, creating a totally useless yet highly entertaining mod (see video above). It's really well done, too. For example, fire a weapon, and you hear...

Fingernail Scratching Could Be Newest Way to Answer Your Phone

A new device, developed by a team of researchers at Carnegie Mellon University's Human-Computer Interaction Institute, might wind up scratching an itch that cell phone users didn't even know they had. Or, at the least, it'll have them scratching a lot more often. The 'Scratch Input' uses the sound produced by scratching your fingernail across a surface -- wood, fabric, what have you -- to...

Why Do We Sound Different Through a Microphone?

You've spent hours writing quality comedic YouTube material and perfecting your delivery, but when you finally watch your masterpiece, your voice doesn't sound deep and smooth like you'd expected. Instead, you sound like a whiny, pubescent goob. What's the deal? PopSci.com recently asked Vanderbilt University audiology professor why a person's recorded voice sounds different than what they hear...