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Tag: NEWSPAPER

New York Times Drops Paywall Subscriptions to $0.99... For Now

With its paywall rolling out in the U.S. this afternoon, the New York Times is attempting to sweeten the deal with $0.99 subscriptions for the first four weeks of subscription. (Why, that's a 97-percent savings!) The Times is obviously doing this out of the goodness of its heart, and the sale certainly doesn't imply that the paper's nervous about its paywall implementation. Nope, not nervous in...

New York Times to Introduce Digital Paywall on March 28th

On March 28th, the New York Times will begin charging all but the most infrequent users to read articles online. Under the plan, users will be able to read 20 articles per month at no charge. Once they click on the 21st piece, however, they'll be presented with three payment options: $15 for four weeks a month of online and mobile app access, $20 for access to the site and the iPad app, or...

Extra, Extra: Online News and Ad Sales Overtake Print

Call it. Time of death: 2010. For the first time, online news readership and ad revenue has surpassed its print counterpart in the U.S., according to the Pew Research Center. Released today, the fact-tank's State of the News Media report noted that 41-percent of Americans get "most of their news about national and international issues" from the Internet -- a 17-percent jump from last year....

Facebook Upset Over Pedophile Story, Threatens to Sue Daily Mail

Facebook is none too pleased with the way the Daily Mail titled a recent story about a gang of pedophiles in the U.K., and the social network is willing to go to court to settle it. On Friday, the paper ran a front-page story about a "complex child abuse investigation," involving a group of pedophiles operating out of Devon and more than 20 children who may have been targeted. At the time, it...

Study: TV Remains Primary News Source for Most Americans, But Internet Gains Ground

The majority of Americans still rely on television as their primary news source, but, according to a new study from the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press, the Internet is gaining ground. In a Pew national survey, 66-percent of all Americans cited TV as their main source for national and international news, down from 74-percent three years ago, and 82-percent in 2002. The Internet,...

Norwegian Newspaper Say it Has All of WikiLeaks' Diplomatic Cables

A Norwegian newspaper claims it has obtained roughly 250,000 of WikiLeak's classified diplomatic cables, although it's not exactly clear how it gained access to the documents. Ole Erik Almlid, managing editor of the Oslo-based daily Aftenposten, confirmed to CNN that his publication had indeed gotten hold of the entire file, but would not say how it had done so, or, more importantly, whether or...

Steve Jobs, Rupert Murdoch to Launch iPad Newspaper

Rumor has it that Steve Jobs and Rupert Murdoch are joining forces to create the world's first digital "newspaper" designed exclusively for the iPad. The new publication, titled the 'Daily,' will be officially unveiled at the end of the month before launching sometime early next year. As the Guardian explains, the publication will combine "a tabloid sensibility with a broadsheet intelligence," and...

Bob Woodward Stars in Bizarre Ad for Washington Post iPad App

The Washington Post has recently stepped into the e-publishing trade with its own iPad app, but, according to the paper's new commercial, all of its journalists are totally dumbstruck to be living in a post-print 2010. (See it after the break.) The ad begins when someone in the newsroom tells Bob Woodward about the iPad and about the Post's new app. Woodward immediately abandons whatever he was...

Amazon to Finally Let You Lend Kindle Books to Friends

Kindle-wielding bibliophiles will soon be able to share their favorite books with their literary friends, thanks to a new book lending policy that Amazon announced on Friday. As TechCrunch explains, the new policy will allow readers to lend out their e-books to other Kindle users, who will be allowed 14 days of alone time with the lender's publication of choice. There are, however, some catches....

Arthur Sulzberger Jr. Admits Paper Days of the New York Times Are Numbered

Perhaps like the executioner with axe in hand, we bloggers have, for some time, been grimly certain of print's inevitable demise. Still, our heads hung yet lower today following New York Times publisher Arthur Sulzberger, Jr.'s concessive words: "we will stop printing the New York Times sometime in the future." While Sulzberger wouldn't speculate as to when that day will come, the axe is most...

Study Finds That Readers Don't Read Print Media, But Don't Trust Online News, Either

As print journalism continues to die a slow death, consumers are flocking to the Internet to get their news. According to a recent study, though, people are still having a hard time trusting what they read online. A report from the Center for the Digital Future at the University of Southern California finds that more than 75-percent of users rank the Internet as the most important source of...

Paywall Cuts Murdoch's Times Traffic by Two-Thirds

As you may be aware, U.K.-based paper The Times recently put up a paywall for some of its online content, much to the chagrin of pretty much everyone who isn't named Rupert Murdoch. It should come as no surprise, then, that the paper's online readership has fallen off steeply since the wall was implemented. Still, the drop hasn't been as bad as some had anticipated. As Reuters reports, the...

The Sun Chronicle Wants Readers to Pay and Use Real Names in Order to Comment

The bad experiments in paywalls have begun. We knew we'd be seeing more newspapers and magazines charging readers to access some (or all) of their websites' content, and we knew that there would be a lot of crazy attempts to implement paywalls before anyone found a sustainable model (that is, if one exists at all). Local newspaper The Sun Chronicle, based in Massachusetts, has come up with one of...

Boston Globe Sends Readers on Mobile SCVNGR Hunt

No longer content to just sit in the background and feed its readers their daily news, the Boston Globe has launched a new mobile scavenger hunt that sends its readers around the city. The 'Boston Globe Trek' uses SCVNGR, a location-based game system that's similar to Foursquare or Gowalla, to challenge users to solve riddles, snap photos of landmarks, and scan unique QR codes. After...

Newspapers Install Credit Card Readers on Vending Machines

In an effort to retain a dwindling readership, some newspapers are equipping vending machines with credit and debit card readers. According to Advertising Age, The Wall Street Journal installed card readers on 190 newspaper boxes located in the greater New York area. It's a matter of convenience for customers, since many more people carry a Visa or Mastercard in their pockets than do quarters. The...