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Facebook Most Blacklisted Site in 2010, OpenDNS Says

Web security firm OpenDNS has just released its annual list of the most blacklisted sites across homes, businesses and schools. And, perhaps not surprisingly, Facebook came out on top. OpenDNS' 2010 report on 'Web Content Filtering and Phishing' (PDF) shows that a full 14.2-percent of networks using the company's services have blacklisted Facebook, 9.9-percent blocked access to MySpace, and 8.1...

Germany Proposes Law to Ban Employers From Spying on Facebook Profiles

Our commenters give us a lot of heat for hating on Facebook (e.g., "Whassamatta, AOL? Jealouz??"), but we have to admit that, from time to time, we love to use the social network to stalk. And, frankly, who doesn't? Employers have known for a few years now that some of the best insight into a job applicant's life is through their unvarnished Facebook profile. Those knee-jerk rants and party pics c...

Woman Quits With E-Mail Reveal of Boss's 'FarmVille' Addiction

Updated: Well it looks like the tale of our sassy quitter may be too good to be true. Peter Kafka at All Things Digital did some homework and uncovered that the guys behind theCHIVE (the site that broke the Jenny story) were also behind a prank piece about Donald Trump leaving a $10,000 tip that tricked The New York Post and Fox News. Leo Resig, one of the site's founders refused to confirm or ...

Potential Employers Go to Google, Facebook to Dig Up Dirt on You

We already knew that employers and hiring managers do Web-based during the job-hiring process. There's enough anecdotal evidence out there that you probably didn't need to read Microsoft's study that found 70-percent of U.S. hiring managers rejected applicants based on their online activities. But that tidbit of information is pretty useless unless you know where they're looking (though you shoul...

Job Seekers Changing Names to Hide Facebook Profiles

Share Employees and job seekers are learning, slowly it seems, that anything they post online is fair game for employers. We don't need the recent survey commissioned by Microsoft to tell us that managers and recruiters are turning to social networks to review applicants, but a little reinforcement of the point doesn't hurt. Rather than exercising some well-advised self-censorship, though, new...

Your Online Reputation Is More Important Than You Think

If you are a relatively good person and are finding it impossible to get a job -- or a date -- you may want to Google yourself. Approximately 70-percent of employers look up job applicants online. 50-percent admit information they have dug up on the Internet has resulted in them not hiring a person. The threat to your reputation and livelihood is real. Luckily, there are steps you can take to e...