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Tag: CHIP

ICEDOT Medical ID Chips Help Track Players' Health on the Field

Earlier this season, the University of Oklahoma Sooners football team began wearing In Case of Emergency Dot (ICEDOT) chips during games. The small red disks, which clip onto a jersey, can securely store a patient's entire medical history, and give emergency workers immediate access to it via an eight-digit PIN. Not only is it much faster to access digital records than paper records at the...

Homeland Security to Develop Cell Phones That 'Smell' Poisonous Gas

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security wants to make us into walking poison detectors. According to Physorg, as part of a program called Cell-All, the department will develop by the end of the year 40 cell phone prototypes that can detect poisonous gas in the air. Officials say cell phones available today can be modified to do this by simply inserting a chip that costs less than $1. When the...

Live Nation Fighting Ticket Scalpers With Digital Wristbands

In an effort to combat ticket fraud, the world's largest concert promoter, Live Nation, is testing digital wristbands that could replace paper tickets. According to BBC News, the wristbands, which have already been used at small music festivals in the U.K., come loaded with a unique "smart chip." By preloading the chips with personal information, Live Nation ensures music fans don't purchase a...

Paper 'Chips' Could Provide Cheap Diagnosis of HIV and Hepatitis

In developing nations, many treatable diseases kill thousands because there's no cheap and accessible way for diagnosis. But a Harvard professor may have discovered an affordable way for people to diagnose a disease from their homes. According to CNN, Harvard chemistry professor George Whitesides created a "paper chip" prototype, barely bigger than your fingerprint, that would cost pennies to...

Thumbnail-Sized Chip Holds Equivalent of 20 HD DVDs

Engineers at North Carolina State University have created a computer chip that holds one terabyte -- or 1,000 gigabytes -- of data and is no larger than a fingernail. For perspective, that means you could store 20 high-definition DVDs or 250 million pages of text on this tiny chip. According to Computer World, this modern marvel is made possible by a process called selective doping, in which...

Intel Developing New Chip for Sub-$250 Computers

When Intel typically develops and debuts a new microprocessor to the computer buying public, it usually gets fanfare around new high speeds attained -- and, of course, the higher price point. The Santa Clara, Calif.-based company may be bucking its own trend the next time around, however, as it finishes development of a new low-priced, smaller-sized chip code named "Diamondville." This new chip,...