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Tag: DRIVING

Brazilian Drivers Use Twitter to Avoid DUI Checkpoints

Over the past two years, police in Rio de Janeiro have been cracking down on drunk drivers as part of a strict city-wide campaign. Many motorists, however, have found a way to avoid the watchful eye of Rio's law enforcers: Twitter. Under Operation Lei Seca ("dry law"), Rio police have been setting up checkpoints at accident hotspots across the city, where they administer breathalyzer tests to...

'Smart' Red Light System Predicts and Prevents Traffic Collisions

In about a month, the city of Marysville, California will test the country's first "smart" red light system, which is designed to predict and prevent traffic collisions at intersections. According to Sacramento's Fox 40 News, the city has incorporated predictive software into an existing red-light camera system, which is located at the intersection of 3rd and F streets. The system predicts when...

Driver Who Killed Pedestrian Was Updating Facebook Status, Lawsuit Claims

A driver who killed a pedestrian late last year was allegedly updating her Facebook status behind the wheel, according to a lawsuit filed by the victim's family. On December 7th, 70-year-old Raymond Veloz was driving around Chicago's South Side when he got in a minor accident. When Veloz got out of his car to inspect the damage and exchange information with the driver of the other car, a woman...

Study Says Video Games Breed Reckless, Risky (and Skilled) Drivers

Well, 'Grand Theft Auto,' you've done it again. According to a Continental Tyre study, enthusiasts of driving games "take more risks than non-gaming drivers" and more frequently engage in dangerous street maneuvers. The statistics (culled from 1,000 gamers and 1,000 non-gamers) indicate that driving gamers crash, hit parked vehicles, sideswipe other cars, violate one-way streets and run red lights...

Amphibious HydroCar Listed on eBay for $777,000

Gearheads with cash to burn might want to bid on this amphibious, 762-horsepower HydroCar, which is currently listed for $777,000 on eBay. Rick Dobbertin spent nine years and more than 18,000 hours personally building the HydroCar, which can go from driving on land to floating on water by lowering and extending a pair of giant pontoons. Despite all that work, Dobbertin never could figure out how...

'Anti Sleep Pilot' Warns Drowsy Drivers When to Pull Over

It won't be able to help the U.S. drivers who are taking long trips this holiday season, but a new in-car device available in Denmark prevents drivers from dozing off by testing their awareness and monitoring their vehicle's movements. The Anti Sleep Pilot sits on the dash, and monitors the car's speed and direction, while intermittently asking the driver to tap its surface in order to combat...

Creepy ASSET Cam Catches You Speeding, Checks Your Insurance

Finland is testing out a new traffic cam that not only spies you when you speed, but uses image-analysis software to read your license plate, check your insurance and tax status, and even determine whether or not you're wearing your seatbelt. Not creeped out yet? The ASSET speed cameras can also dole out tickets for tailgating, by measuring the distance between you and the car in front of you....

Autonomous Vans Drive Themselves From Italy to China

Pack up your high-tech sensors, artificial vision systems and solar-powered laser scanners, because it's time for a road trip of the nerdiest order! A fleet of electric vans has just completed an arduous 8,000-mile journey across Europe and Asia -- and the caravan accomplished the ordeal without human drivers or physical maps (although there were a few backseat scientists on board). Dispatched by...

GPS Leads Spanish Man to Reservoir and a Watery Grave

We've learned by know that stubbornly following your GPS can lead to all sorts of trouble. Usually, the incidents result in little more than embarrassment and a lesson learned the hard way. Sadly, for a man on his way home from a street fair near the Spanish town of Capilla, it led to a close call for his passenger and to his own death. The 37-year-old man was driving home in his Peugeot 306...

Following GPS, Man Drives Van Up Swiss Mountain, Gets Stuck

Share Most people probably wouldn't drive their cars off a cliff just because their GPS system told them to do it. Driving off-road and up a mountain, on the other hand, is an entirely different story. That's exactly what 37-year-old Robert Ziegler recently did, when his van's GPS system directed him up some ruggedly mountainous terrain in Bergün, Switzerland. Although Ziegler had his...

Tactile Navigation Lets You Feel GPS Directions

When using a GPS, you generally have two choices for getting your directions: looking at the screen, and listening to audio cues. The problem is that taking your eyes off the road, even momentarily, can be dangerous, and the polite British woman (or Darth Vader, depending on your level of geekiness) is not always audible over your blaring stereo and the din of traffic. A new system being...

Distracted Driving Has Killed 16,000 Since 2001, Study Says

Most of us probably don't need to be reminded that texting while driving can put our lives at risk, but, if you're in the mood for especially morbid statistics, here's some food for thought. A new study from the University of North Texas finds that roughly 16,000 people died from 2001 to 2007, simply because their phone distracted them behind the wheel. As Reuters reports, the study used data...

Bus Driver Caught Reading Kindle Behind the Wheel

Texting while driving is bad enough, especially when you're trusted with the lives of dozens of passengers as an employee of a public transportation system. But 40-year-old Lahcen Qouchbane, a driver with Portland's TriMet system, decided that glancing down occasionally to send a message just wasn't dangerous enough. He opted to get some reading done while shuttling TriMet patrons towards...

Distracted Driving Deaths Decline in 2009

Most motorists are, by now, fully aware of the dangers of tech-related driving distractions. U.S. drivers even support, almost universally, outright bans on various vehicular phone activities. Apparently, the laws against in-car mobile usage, the terrifying government campaigns and the gory scare tactics intended to frighten the text out of drivers are finally starting to achieve their desired...

Bump Uses License Plate Image Recognition to Text Fellow Drivers

At this week's DEMO conference in Silicon Valley, a company called Bump unveiled a new mobile technology that allows users to send text messages to complete strangers. Instead of typing in the recipient's phone number, users need only take a single photo of his or her license plate. The service, which launches today, requires users to download an app for their iPhones, and register their...