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Tag: 3DPRINTER

3-D Food Printer Makes Edible Extrusions, Courtesy of Cornell and Dave Arnold

Mad scientist/artist/all-around genius Dave Arnold (yes, the guy who uses a laboratory centrifuge to prepare fig juice) has been working with Cornell University's Fab@Home program to explore the possible uses of 3-D printers in the kitchen. In a recent segment for CNN Money, Arnold and the Cornell crew got to show off the frontiers of computer-controlled food extrusion. Yummo! Wait, wait. We...

The Week in Design: Cornstarch Earbuds and 3-D Printed Shoes

The Web is teeming with the unrealized ideas of both students and established designers who set out to produce astonishing renderings and prototypes for unusual products. Unfortunately, due to the lack of time, money, or technology, many of those products never progress from the planning stages to the mass market. But that doesn't mean we can't salivate over them, nevertheless. As you unwrap...

The Week in Design: A 'Tron'-Inspired Chair and a Robotic Chandelier

The Web is teeming with the unrealized ideas of both students and established designers who set out to produce astonishing renderings and prototypes for unusual products. Unfortunately, due to the lack of time, money, or technology, many of those products never progress from the planning stages to the mass market. But that doesn't mean we can't salivate over them, nevertheless. This week, we...

Scientists Show Off Device That Prints Jello-Like Skin Grafts

Earlier this year, Invetech and Organovo embarked on a joint plan to "print" living tissue (quite different from the more frivolous 3-D printing exploits of other developers). Then, in April, the U.S. Army and Wake Forest University's Institute for Regenerative Medicine started talking up a skin-printing system that laser-maps a wounded area, and -- using two "print heads" -- layers the injury...

The Week in Design: Buckminster Fuller Headphones and Algorithmic Chairs

The Web is teeming with the unrealized ideas of both students and established designers who set out to produce astonishing renderings and prototypes for unusual products. Unfortunately, due to the lack of time, money, or technology, many of those products never move from the planning stages to the mass market. But that doesn't mean we can't salivate over their creations, nevertheless. The good...

MakerLegoBot Printer Builds LEGO Creations for Us, Can't Print Itself

As if the programmable LEGO Mindstorms toys weren't brilliant enough on their own, fanatics over at BattleBricks decided to construct a fully functioning 3-D LEGO printer, made entirely from three NXT kits and nine NXT motors. The machine, named MakerLegoBot in homage to the MakerBot series of 3-D printers, uses only standard LEGO bricks as building material, fed from AutoCAD designs. Can the...

The Week in Design: ECG Toasters and Disposable Printers

The Web is teeming with the unrealized ideas of both students and established designers who set out to produce astonishing renderings and prototypes for unusual products. Unfortunately, due to the lack of time, money, or technology, many of those products never progress from the planning stages to the mass market. But that doesn't mean we can't salivate over them, nevertheless. This week we...

Design Concepts: New Explorations in 3-D

The Web is teeming with the unrealized ideas of both students and established designers who set out to produce astonishing renderings and prototypes for unusual products. Unfortunately, due to the lack of time, money, or technology, many of those products never progress from the planning stages to the mass market. But that doesn't mean we can't salivate over them, nevertheless. We've talked...

Design Concepts: Future Fashion

Share The Web is teeming with the unrealized ideas of both students and established designers who set out to produce astonishing renderings and prototypes for unusual products. Unfortunately, due to the lack of time, money, or technology, many of those products never progress from the planning stages to the mass market. But that doesn't mean we can't salivate over them, nevertheless. ...

McGill Researchers Unveil 3-D Ice Printer, Make Frosty Beer Steins

Devoted Switched readers will already know that we've been following the development of 3-D printing technology pretty closely -- from our challenge to Design Glut with the DIY MakerBot printer, to byAMT Studio's jewelry work, to Unfold's experiments with ceramics and virtual potters' wheels, to Organovo's human tissue generator and even a 3-D skin printer. What can those crazy 3-D enthusiasts...

Google Maps Brings Earth to the Party, Make Photos With Your Laptop Screen

There's a load of great tech news happening out there every day, and, unfortunately, we just can't cover it all. Here are a few of the other noteworthy things we saw today on our never-ending journey through the wild, wild Web. Whoa! Have you checked out Google Maps lately? The search engine giant recently began to incorporate Google Earth into Maps, resulting in an entirely 3-D environment...

A Virtual Potter's Wheel by Unfold and Tim Knapen

The devoted Switched readers and design nuts among you will remember that we covered Belgian studio Unfold's ceramic 3-D printer back in February. Now, Unfold has teamed up with interaction designer Tim Knapen to create 'L'artisan Electronique,' a sort of virtual potter's wheel. Using Unfold's 3-D printer, which converts ceramic powder into solid forms with a coiling technique (that has its...

D-Shape Printer Makes Full-Scale Sand Structures

As children building sandcastles on the beach, we often dreamt of what it would be like to inhabit our creations. Perhaps designer Enrico Dini was thinking the same thing when he created his D-Shape printer, which can build full-scale buildings using sand. The gigantic printer alternates sprays of sand and binding glue, the latter of which turns the sand to rock. Slowly, the rock is built up...

This Ain't Your Momma's 3-D Printer: Unfold Goes Ceramic

With reasonably priced 3-D printers hitting the market, and DIY versions becoming more prevalent, we're now entering a very exciting time in which designers are experimenting with the materials they send through their extruders. We wrote back in November about Belgian design outfit Unfold and the Utanalog teapot it displayed at the Bits 'n Pieces Exhibition. Now, Unfold has successfully used its...

Sculptures Use Inkjets and 3-D Printers to Track Plant Growth

Designer David Bowen has created some amazing mechanical sculptures that react to the growth of plants. Using hydroponically grown greenery as its input, the Growth Rendering Device scans the plant's shape ever 24 hours and then prints a rasterized inkjet rendering of the growth. The device then unfurls four inches of paper to make room for the next day's drawing. As an autonomous art experiment,...