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Facebook Photos Lead to Underage Drinking Fines

We've seen wives pose as teens to bust cheating husbands and collections agencies impersonate cute girls to catch debt dodgers, but this is the first time we've ever heard of police using their precious time to send teens friend requests on Facebook just to troll their photos for evidence of underage drinking.

Students at the University of Wisconsin - La Crosse have found themselves on the wrong end of a seemingly major sting operation. According to the La Crosse Tribune, at least four students from the school have been invited to court and fined for underage drinking over the past few weeks. The pieces of evidence presented in all the cases have been photos taken from the students' Facebook pages. One of those in trouble, Adam Bauer, told the Tribune that he believes the photos were obtained by police who posed as a "good-looking" 19-year-old girl and sent him a friend request about a month ago. Shortly thereafter Bauer was asked to come into the local police precinct.

Bauer wasn't shy about sharing his feelings about the methods, either, making allusions to '1984' and saying, "They are always watching." Another student busted on Facebook, sophomore Tyrell Luebker, called the practice "shady" and "a waste of taxpayer money," when interviewed by the Tribune. Luebker and Bauer aren't in the minority, either. Fellow sophomore Brianna Niesen worried that the practice would discourage students from calling police to report serious crimes for fear of being nabbed for underage drinking.

We certainly don't condone drunken youngsters here at Switched, but we do find ourselves agreeing with the students on this one. Police have better things to do than troll Facebook and MySpace, hunting for photos of college kids holding 40s. [From: La Crosse Tribune]

Tags: crime, facebook, law, police, privacy, top, underage drinking, UnderageDrinking

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