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Wearable Vicon Camera Lets You Log Every Moment of Your Life

Potentially taking the place of moms and their ever-flashing cameras, a new device allows people to document their lives simply by wearing it. According to New Scientist, U.K.-based firm Vicon has licensed technology from Microsoft Research Cambridge in order to produce the camera, which automatically snaps pictures as users wear it around their necks. The device, which can be programmed to take photos as often as every 30 seconds, whenever light changes in an environment, or when the camera detects body heat, was originally designed to aid the memory of Alzheimer's patients by allowing them to look back on their "lifelogs" at the end of each day.

Now, Vicon has plans to mass-produce the camera. It will retail for around $820 when it's released to researchers in the next few months, but will hopefully cost less when it hits store shelves in 2010. Dubbed the ViconRevue, the camera can store about 30,000 pictures on its 1-gigabyte memory card, and it's about the size of a pendant. For scientific purposes, we think this device is a great idea. But most folks, ourselves included, don't lead lives so interesting that they warrant dozens of photographs throughout the day. Making the sandwich and sitting on the couch is boring enough. Watching ourselves as we make a sandwich and sit on the couch would be intolerable. [From: New Scientist]

Tags: camera, documentary, health, memory, photos, science, top

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