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Viewing Porn at Work Even Easier With New Tech


Despite the ever increasing Web surfing limits placed on employees at work, it looks like porn in the office is still an ongoing issue for many companies, according to a recent USA Today article. About 65% of U.S. employers use monitoring software, but the advent of wireless Internet and gadgets such as BlackBerrys and iPods have made continuous monitoring almost impossible, according to the CEO of PR firm RLM, Richard Laermer.

"There is nothing you can do," Laermer tells USA Today. "Liability is the thing that keeps me up at night, because we are liable for things people do on your premises. It's serious. I'll see somebody doing it, and I'll peek over their shoulder, and they'll say, 'I don't know how that happened.' It's like 10-year-olds. And it's always on company time."

Though many employees claim that ending up on such sites is often accidental, others troll the naughty sites at work for the thrill of it and some even claim to have a medical reason for doing so, like James Pacenza, a former IBM employee and Vietnam vet who said that his at-work porn-viewing helped him to get over post-traumatic stress disorder.

Pacenza was fired from IBM in 2003 for his porn habit, but he's currently suing the company because he found it unfair that those with drug or alcohol problems were allowed to continue at the company with treatment while he was not, citing his age as the real reason he was let go (though he has since dropped the age-discrimination claim). IBM is trying to get the case dismissed.

So what's next, a cell-phone and Wi-Fi network blocker for the workplace like they have at Apple announcements every time Steve Jobs unveils a new product?

From USA Today


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Tags: BlackBerry, breaking+news, IBM, monitoring software, MonitoringSoftware, porn, security, top, wireless

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